Sunday, November 29, 2020

Amsterdam Itinerary (Video + Tips)

Amsterdam first appears as a huge city. I stood in awe as I floated across the wide river on a ferry one night to...
More

    Latest Posts

    Amsterdam Itinerary (Video + Tips)

    Amsterdam first appears as a huge city. I stood in awe as I floated across the wide river on a ferry one night to...

    You Can Always Be Criticised, No Matter What

    No matter what you do, people can find a way to criticise you. And in a way, that's freeing. I should know. I work as...

    Why Bad People Don’t Want You to Succeed

    I've always felt like I had to work 3 times harder than everyone else to achieve the same results. That's not because I'm less intelligent...

    Using the Knock-On Effect to Build Healthy Routines

    Do you want a healthy morning, evening, or self-care routine? It might be easier than you think by using natural innate behaviour. Studies have shown...

    You Can Always Be Criticised, No Matter What

    No matter what you do, people can find a way to criticise you. And in a way, that’s freeing.

    I should know. I work as a leader at a huge company with people above me and people below me.

    On all issues small and large: from approving someone’s holiday request, to management of a multi-thousand pound budget. Every decision has pros and cons, and thus can be criticised no matter which path you choose to take.

    If I approve someone’s holiday to make them happy (and all the other benefits that come from that), I get criticised because we’ll have less manpower in during that week. If I reject the holiday, I get criticised because they’ll be unhappy.

    If I spend my time as the sole manager of a budget that was randomly assigned to me instead of HR, I get criticised from not doing my main job and wasting time. If I focus on my core role, I get criticised for neglecting my extra duties and my competence comes into question.

    Even if there’s a clear-cut right thing to do and I followed it to the letter, I get criticised for not consulting my boss first (no matter how small and inside my responsibilities the decision). If I consult my boss first, they criticise me for not acting, not showing initiative, & not being proactive.

    See, after the event, someone else can criticise you because 1) a different person will have a different perspective/opinion, 2) they know how your decision played out, 3) they have the advantage of hindsight, and 4) they don’t know how their decision would have played out. So you really, really can’t win in their eyes.

    That impossibility is something I’ve spent 3 intense months realising. It’s the result of bad people coming together to collectively hate good people. There’s only 1 thing you can do:

    Advice: 1) Do what you honestly think is the right thing to do in that moment. 2) Remember the reasons (X, Y, Z) that you made that decision. 3) Stand by it.

    That is all you can do. You will still be criticised, and potentially ridiculed, ostracised, & humiliated. But you would have been anyway. At least this way, you’ll have done the closest to the right thing you could, covered yourself morally/legally, and backed yourself up.

    I do this now, and regularly find that it reduces evil, malicious people to acting like children.

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here

    Latest Posts

    Amsterdam Itinerary (Video + Tips)

    Amsterdam first appears as a huge city. I stood in awe as I floated across the wide river on a ferry one night to...

    You Can Always Be Criticised, No Matter What

    No matter what you do, people can find a way to criticise you. And in a way, that's freeing. I should know. I work as...

    Why Bad People Don’t Want You to Succeed

    I've always felt like I had to work 3 times harder than everyone else to achieve the same results. That's not because I'm less intelligent...

    Using the Knock-On Effect to Build Healthy Routines

    Do you want a healthy morning, evening, or self-care routine? It might be easier than you think by using natural innate behaviour. Studies have shown...

    Don't Miss

    Stay in touch

    Get a summary of the week's posts to your inbox.